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Whitney Land Company
101 SE Third
P.O. Box 1614
Pendleton, Oregon 97801
Phone: 541-278-4444

Lazy 66 Ranch

Condon, Oregon

Price  $ 1,750,000.00

Location:

This ranch lies 10 miles south of Condon, Oregon, on East Thirty Mile Creek, in Gilliam County.

Acreage:

The total number of acres for sale is 2,248± deeded. Of the 2,248 acres, 750 are tillable soils currently enrolled in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) through Sept. 30, 2022. The CRP contract provides an annual payment of $55,327.00, 407 acres of tillable ground currently planted to wheat, and the remaining acres include 1,091 acres of range.

Identification of Subject Property:

Gilliam County –

  • T4S R22E TL 2700- 440.00 acres
  • T4S R22E TL 3800- 971.20 acres
  • T4S R21E TL 3800- 836.80 acres

Topography and Soils:

The dominant topographic feature of this parcel is a ridge top that extends into the property from the east extending northwesterly. The high elevation point is in the southeasterly portion at 2,100± feet, declining to 1,642 feet at the north edge.
According to the USDA Soil Conservation Service Soil Survey of Gilliam County, the principle soils of cropland are Valby silt loam, with slopes to 20%, while the range land soils are Lickskillet very Stoney loam, with slopes to 40% and Nansene silt loam with slopes to 70%.
The Valby silt loam is rated as a Class III soils while the Lickskillet and Nansene soils are rated Class VII soils. The soils on the parcel are fairly typical for the surrounding area. Please see the soils map and descriptions in the back of this package.

Improvements:

Main Residence:

County records indicate the home was built in 1933 and has a total of 1,654 square feet. It has a concrete foundation and wood siding. The main floor contains entry foyer, living room, dining room, kitchen, two bedrooms, one bathroom and laundry facilities. The dormered attic contains an additional two bedrooms. The basement is utilized for storage and the house has been well maintained.

Feeder Barn:

The barn has overall dimensions of 36’x48’ with a center loft section. It is constructed of wood and has a metal roof.

Shop:

The concrete block structure has dimensions of 14’x36. This building has concrete foundation and floor, concrete block exterior walls and metal roofing.

Additional Outbuildings:

There is an additional barn with dimensions of 12’x30’ that has been used as a chicken house in the past. This building has wood siding and metal roof. Also, there is a 10’x10’ small shed that could be used for any purpose.

Recreation:

The subject property includes three LOP tags within the Fossil Unit (45). Deer, elk, and upland game birds inhabit the property.

Taxes:

2016-2017: $4,973.96

Mineral Rights:

The owner does not warrant there are any mineral rights available; however, any mineral or geothermal rights owned by the seller are included as part of the property being offered for sale.

Power:

Columbia Basin Electric Company.

• ZONING •

The land is zoned Exclusive Farm Use (EFU).

Fencing:

Fencing throughout consists of barbwire fence and pole corrals. The boundaries are fenced.

Demographics of Condon, Oregon:

As of the census of 2010, there were 682 people, 357 households, and 184 families residing in the city. The population density was 821.7 inhabitants per square mile (317.3/km2). There were 455 housing units at an average density of 548.2 per square mile (211.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.2% White, 0.1% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.9% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.
There were 357 households of which 16.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 48.5% were not families. 45.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 24.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.85 and the average family size was 2.54.

The median age in the city was 54.5 years. 14.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 15.4% were from 25 to 44; 34.7% were from 45 to 64; and 31.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.6% male and 53.4% female.

Education:

Public schools located in the city of Condon and are part of the Condon School District. Schools: The following are schools in Condon: Elementary (K-5) Middle (6-8) High (9-12) 

History of Condon, Oregon:

Condon was the southern terminus of the Condon Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad. In 1883, a local homesteader named Potter platted the land around a spring on his property. The spring, which emerged from a bed of black basalt, was known to pioneer ranchers in the area as Summit Springs. Experiencing financial difficulty, Potter surrendered the site to the legal firm Condon and Cornish from Arlington. Harvey C. Condon, a member of the firm, was a nephew of Oregon geologist Thomas Condon. Condon and Cornish sold lots in the town site and in 1884, resident David B. Trimble applied for a post office and became its first postmaster. He named the post office Condon after Harvey C. Condon. Condon Air Force Station was a radar station near the city that operated from 1951 to 1970.

History of Gilliam County, Oregon:

The Oregon Legislative Assembly created Gilliam County on February 25, 1885, from the eastern third of Wasco County after residents complained that they were too far from their county seat in The Dalles. The first Gilliam county seat was at Alkali, now Arlington. The question of a permanent county seat was placed on general election ballots in 1886, 1888, and again in 1890, when voters chose to move the county seat to Condon, known to early settlers as “Summit Springs.” Once the question of the location of the county seat was settled, voters in Gilliam County proved reluctant to provide a courthouse in Condon. The county government operated out of a two-room house until 1903, when the county court appropriated money to construct a courthouse. This courthouse burned down in 1954 and was replaced the following year with the current courthouse.
Thereafter, apparently nothing much happened until the Shepherds Flat Wind Farm, an 845 megawatt (MW) wind farm, began construction in Eastern Oregon, in both Gilliam and Morrow counties, near Arlington. Approved in 2008 by state regulators, groundbreaking came in 2009. The wind farm was being built by Caithness Energy using General Electric (GE) 2.5 MW wind turbines, and it will supply electricity to Southern California Edison. In April, 2011, Google announced they had invested $100 million in the project. The wind farm was estimated to have an economic impact of $16 million annually for Oregon.

Soil Survey:

28E – Lickskillet very stony loam, 7 to 40 percent slopes. This is a shallow, well-drained soil formed in material weathered from loess and colluvium. It occurs on south- and west-facing slopes at elevations of 800 to 3,500 feet. The average slope is 20 percent. The average annual precipitation is 10 to 13 inches, and the average annual air temperature is 47 to 51 degrees F. The frost free period is 100 to 150 days at 32 degrees and 150 to 210 days at 28 degrees.
In a representative profile the surface layer is very dark grayish brown, very stony loam about 2 inches thick. The subsoil is dark brown extremely cobbly heavy loam about 15 inches thick,. Fractured basalt is at a depth of about 17 inches.
About 20 percent of this unit is included areas of Bakeoven soils and basalt outcrop and 10 percent is Mikkalo, Valby, Morrow, and Wrentham soils.
Permeability is moderate. Effective rooting depth is 12 to 20 inches. Effective rooting depth is 12 to 20 inches. Available water capacity is 1 to 3 inches. Water supplying capacity is 2 to 5 inches. Runoff is rapid, and the hazard of erosion is high.
This soil is used for livestock grazing and wildlife habitat.
The major concern is maintaining an adequate plant cover for control of water erosion. The native plant community is dominated by blue bunch wheatgrass. Sandberg bluegrass and Thurber needle grass are prominent. Various perennial forbs occur throughout the stand in small amounts. Shrubs are minor in the stand.
If range condition deteriorates, blue bunch wheatgrass decreases and the proportion of Sandberg bluegrass and Thurber needle grass increases. If deterioration is severe, the forage bunchgrasses are nearly eliminated. As a result, much of the surface is left bare and the hazard of soil erosion is high.
Because the soil is shallow and stony, seedbed preparation and range seeding generally are not practical.
Most areas of this soil provide some food and cover for mule deer, small mammals and game birds.
The depth to bedrock, stoniness, and slope are severe limitations for community and recreation uses. Extensive design modifications are needed but in most cases are not practical for dwellings, small buildings and sanitary facilities.
The capability subclass is VIIs. . . .
63B—Valby silt loam, 1 to 7 percent slopes. This is a moderately deep soil formed in loess mixed with some ash over basalt. It is on uplands of the Columbia Plateau at elevations of 1,600 to 3,600 feet. The average annual precipitation is 11 to 14 inches, and the average annual air temperature is 47 to 51 degrees F. The frost-free season is 110 to 150 days at 32 degrees and 150 to 200 days at 28 degrees.
In a representative profile the surface layer is very dark grayish brown silt loam about 8 inches thick. The subsoil is very dark grayish brown and dark brown heavy silt loam about 17 inches thick. The substratum is dark brown, calcareous silt loam about 5 inches thick. Fractured basalt is at a depth of about 30-inches.
About 10 percent of this unit is included areas of Rhea soils and 5 percent is Bakeoven and Lickskillet soils.
Permeability is moderate. Available water capacity is 4 to 8.5 inches. Water supplying capacity is 6 to 8 inches. Effective rooting depth is 20 to 40 inches. Runoff is slow, and the hazard of erosion is slight.
Nearly all the acreage is dry farmed under a grain-fallow system. Wheat is the major crop. Some barley and dryland hay and pasture are grown. The rest of the acreage is used for range and wildlife habitat.
The two major needs in crop management are protecting the soil from erosion and conserving soil moisture.
Stubble mulch, minimum tillage, and grassed waterways along with a crop-fallow system help to maintain soil moisture. Cross-slope tillage in the more level areas and contour tillage and diversions in the steeper areas are desirable, especially where slopes are long.
Response of wheat and barley to nitrogen fertilizer is low as a result of the low annual precipitation. Generally, 25 pounds per acre of nitrogen fertilizer is applied in spring or fall.
Suitable plants for seeding waterways are pubescent wheatgrass, crested wheatgrass, and streambank wheatgrass. For dryland hay and pasture, suitable grasses and legumes grown alone or in combination are alfalfa, big bluegrass, crested wheatgrass, Siberian wheatgrass, and intermediate wheatgrass.
The native plant community is dominated by blue bunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue. Sandberg bluegrass is prominent. A variety of perennial forbs occurs throughout the stand. Shrubs are minor.
If range condition deteriorates, blue bunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue decrease, and the proportion of Sandberg bluegrass and forbs increase. If deterioration is severe, the forage bunchgrasses are nearly eliminated or greatly reduced in vigor. As a result, cheat grass, low value forbs, and shrubs predominate. If range is in poor condition, seedbed preparation and seeding are practical. Suitable for dryland seeding are big bluegrass, crested wheatgrass, beardless wheatgrass, and alfalfa.
Mule deer use this plant community in spring and again in fall when plants are green and succulent. The plant community also provides food for small mammals and game birds.
The depth to bedrock is a limitation for community uses. Design modifications are needed for dwellings, small buildings, and sanitary facilities. The soil has no serious limitations for recreation facilities. Playgrounds in the most sloping areas may need to be leveled.
The capability subclass is IIIs dryland.
63C—Valby silt loam, 7 to 12 percent slopes. This is a moderately deep soil formed in loess mixed with some ash over basalt bedrock. It is on uplands of the Columbia Plateau at elevations of 1,600 to 3,600 feet. The average annual air temperature is 47- to 51-degrees F. The frost free season is 110- to 150-days at 32 degrees and 150- to 200-days at 28 degrees.
In a representative profile the surface layer is very dark grayish brown silt loam about 8-inches thick. The subsoil is very dark grayish brown and dark brown heavy silt loam about 17-inches thick. The substratum is dark brown, calcareous silt loam about 5-inches thick. Fractured basalt is at a depth of about 30 inches.
 About 10 percent of this unit is included areas of Rhea soils and 5 percent is Bakeoven and Lickskillet soils.
Permeability is moderate. Available water capacity is 4 to 8.5 inches. Water supplying capacity is 6 to 8 inches. Effective rooting depth is 20 to 40 inches. Runoff is medium, and the hazard of erosion is moderate.
Most of the acreage is dry farmed under a grain-fallow system. Wheat is the major crop. Some barley and dryland hay and pasture are grown. The rest of the acreage is used for range and wildlife habitat.
The two major needs in crop management are protecting the soil from water erosion and conserving soil moisture.
Stubble mulch, minimum tillage, and grassed waterways along with a crop-fallow system minimize erosion loss and help to maintain soil moisture. Cross-slope tillage, contour tillage, and diversions are generally needed to prevent severe erosion from rapid runoff during high intensity rainfall or snowmelt.
Response of wheat and barley to nitrogen fertilizer is low as a result of the low annual precipitation. Generally, 25 pounds per acre of nitrogen fertilizer is applied in spring or fall.
Suitable plants for seeding waterways are pubescent wheatgrass, crested wheatgrass, and streambank wheatgrass. For dryland hay and pasture, suitable grasses and legumes grown alone or in combination are alfalfa, big bluegrass, crested wheatgrass, Siberian wheatgrass, and intermediate wheatgrass.
The native plant community is dominated by blue bunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue. Sandberg bluegrass is prominent. A variety of perennial forbs occurs throughout the stand. Shrubs are minor.
If range condition deteriorates, blue bunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue decrease and the proportion of Sandberg bluegrass and forbs increases. If deterioration is severe, the forage bunchgrasses are nearly eliminated or greatly reduced in vigor. As a result, cheat grass, low value forbs, and shrubs predominate.
If the range is in poor condition, seedbed preparation and seeding are practical. Suitable for dryland seeding are big bluegrass, crested wheatgrass, beardless wheatgrass, and alfalfa.
Mule deer use this plant community in spring and again in fall when plants are green and succulent. The plant community also provides food for small mammals and game birds.
The slope and depth to bedrock are severe limitations for community and recreation uses. Extensive design modifications are needed for dwellings, small buildings, sanitary facilities, and recreation facilities.
The capability subclass is IIIe range.

Related Resources:

Gilliam County History: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilliam County, Oregon
Condon, Oregon History: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Condon,_Oregon
Condon School District: http://www.condon.k12.or.us/
Climate: http://www.homefacts.com/
              http://www.city-data.com/

Offered by:
The Whitney Land Company

Todd Longgood, Broker
Email Todd

Timothy 'Scott' Coe, Broker
Email Scott

Please contact The Whitney Land Company office to schedule a showing.  A listing agent must be present at all times to tour the property.

NOTICE
All of the information within this sales package has been gathered from State, County and City records and officials as well as others who are deemed reliable; however, the broker and agents can not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information herein contained. It is also subject to change, prior sale or withdrawal.